8th International Workshop on Magnetic Particle Imaging

Hamburg, Germany | 2018, March 23 - 24


Thank you all for a great workshop IWMPI2018 with inspiring conversations, interesting talks and innovative posters. We hope you all returned back home safe and sound with plenty of new ideas.

The 8th IWMPI took place at the University Medical Center Hamburg Eppendorf (UKE), Germany on March 22 - 24, 2018.

Scientific Program

Thursday, March 22, 2018

10:00Tutorials
12:30DGBMT Fachausschusssitzung Magnetische Methoden in der Medizin - Lecture Hall
12:30Welcome Reception
13:30Opening
13:45Keynote - Lawrence L. Wald: Assessing MPI as a functional brain imaging modality
14:15S01 - Tracer Synthesis and Characterization I
 Chairs: Silvio Dutz (Germany), Lutz Trahms (Germany) 
T01Synthesis and Characterisation of Zn0.1Co0.9Fe2O4
Nurcan Dogan, Gebze Technical University, Kocaeli, Turkey
T02

Response of suspensions of microfabricated magnetic discs to time varying fields
Leon Abelmann, KIST Europe, Germany

T03Evaluation of magnetic particle imaging using blood-pooling magnetic nanoparticles
Yasushi Takemura, Yokohama National University, Japan
T04Magnetic Fractionation of Resovist® Nanoparticles for Magnetic Particle Imaging
Takashi Yoshida, Kyushu University, Fukuoka, Japan
15:15S02 - Tracer Synthesis and Characterization II (Poster and Coffee)
P01synomag® Nanoflower Particles: A new Tracer for MPI, Physical Characterization and initial in vitro Toxicity Studies
Cordula Grüttner, micromod Partikeltechnologie GmbH, Rostock, Germany
P02Differential magnetometry on Fe2O3 nano-clustered particles
Leon Abelmann, KIST Europe, Germany
P03Continuous-Flow Synthesis of Superparamagnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles
Jan Magonov, University of Luebeck, Institute of Medical Engineering, Luebeck, Germany
P04Synthesis of Super-paramagnetic Iron Oxides Nanoparticles Subjected to Magnetic Fields
Ankit Malhotra, Institute of Medical Engineering, University of Lübeck, Lübeck, Germany
P05Comparison of Superparamagnetic Quantifier and Magnetic Particle Spectroscopy
Melissa van de Loosdrecht, Magnetic Detection and Imaging group, Faculty of Science and Technology, University of Twente, Enschede, the Netherlands
P06From MPI tracer materials to target-specific in vivo diagnostics
David Heinke, nanoPET Pharma GmbH, Berlin, Germany
P07Biocompatible Magnetic Fluids of Modified Co-Ferrite Nanoparticles with Tunable Magnetic Properties
Silvio Dutz, Institute of Biomedical Engineering and Informatics, Technische Universität Ilmenau, Ilmenau, Germany
P08Preservation Procedures for Protein-coated Magnetic Nanoparticles and their Interaction with Biological Systems
Silvio Dutz, Institute of Biomedical Engineering and Informatics, Technische Universität Ilmenau, Ilmenau, Germany
P09New MPI Tracer Material – A Resolution Study
Christina Debbeler, Institute of Medical Engineering, University of Lübeck, Lübeck, Germany
15:15S03 - Reconstruction I (Poster and Coffee)
P10A comparison of image-based system matrices
Thomas Kampf, University Hospital Würzburg, Würzburg, Germany
P11On the Formulation of the Magnetic Particle Imaging System Function in Fourier Space
Marco Maass, Institute for Signal Processing, University of Lübeck, Lübeck, Germany
P12Spectral filtering for Chebyshev reconstruction algorithms in Magnetic Particle Imaging: a case study for reconstruction on Lissajous nodes
Francesco Marchetti, Department of Women’s and Children’s Health, University of Padova, Italy
P13An Alternative X-space Based Image Reconstruction without Partial FOV Processing
Semih Kurt, Bilkent University, Ankara, Turkey
P14Joint Multiresolution Magnetic Particle Imaging and System Matrix Compression
Marco Maass, Instiute for Signal Processing, University of Lübeck, Lübeck, Germany
P15Influence of Excitation Signal Coupling on Reconstructed Images in MPI
Anselm von Gladiss, Institute of Medical Engineering, University of Lübeck, Lübeck, Germany
P16Deconvolution Kernel for 1D X-Space MPI
Aileen Cordes, Institute of Medical Engineering, University of Lübeck, Lübeck, Germany
P17Reusing System Matrices of Patches in Magnetic Particle Imaging via Mirroring
Mandy Ahlborg, Institute of Medical Engineering, University of Lübeck, Lübeck, Germany
P18Improving generalization properties of measured system matrices by using regularized total least squares reconstruction in MPI
Janna Flötotto, Center for Industrial Mathematics, University of Bremen, Bremen, Germany
P19Temporal Polyrigid Registration for Patch-based MPI Reconstruction of Moving Objects
Jan Ehrhardt, Universität zu Lübeck, Lübeck, Germany
16:30S04 - Methods I
 Chairs: Bennie ten Haken (Netherlands), Yasushi Takemura (Japan) 
T05Image projection estimation in MPI using projected system matrices
Jochen Franke, Bruker BioSpin MRI GmbH, Ettlingen, Germany; Physics of Molecular Imaging Systems, University RWTH Aachen, Germany
T06Fast Multi-Resolution Imaging using Adaptive Feature Detection
Nadine Gdaniec, Section for Biomedical Imaging, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf and Institute for Biomedical Imaging, Hamburg University of Technology
T07Fast System Calibration for MPI Using a Rotating Coded Calibration Scene
Serhat Ilbey, ASELSAN Research Center, 06370 Ankara, Turkey
T08Spatial Resolution in MPI: The Role of Phase
Hoda Bagheri, SFU, Burnaby, Canada
T09Ghost Correction for Multi-Parameter MPI
Michael Herbst, Bruker BioSpin MRI GmbH, Ettlingen, Germany
T10On the determination of the sensitivity in magnetic particle imaging
Matthias Gräser, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf
18:00Get together

Friday, March 23, 2018 (morning)

09:00S05 - Instrumentation I
 Chairs: Alexey Tonyushkin (USA), Hui Hui (China)
T11Improved Receive Hardware Unit for Magnetic Particle Imaging
Hendrik Paysen, Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Berlin, Germany
T12

Adaptive hardware lens for Traveling Wave MPI
Martin Rückert, University of Würzburg, Würzburg, Germany

T13An Approach for Actively Cancelling Direct Feedthrough
Jonas Beuke, Institute of Medical Engineering, University of Lübeck, Lübeck, Germany
T14

MPI meets CT: first hybrid scanner design
Jonathan Markert, Institute of Medical Engineering, University of Würzburg, Würzburg, Germany

T15A Receive Coil Topology Based on Oppositely Tilted Solenoids for a Predefined Drive Field
Jan Stelzner, Institute of Medical Engineering, University of Lübeck, Lübeck, Germany
T16MPI Scanner with Rotating Permanent Magnets
Ulrich Heinen, Hochschule Pforzheim, Pforzheim, Deutschland
10:30S06 - Applications I (Poster and Coffee)
P20Effect of Agarose gel pore size on SPIO MPI Signal strength
Matthias Stoeckmann, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany
P21MPI Arthrography – Proof of Concept in a Phantom Study
Stefan Herz, Universitätsklinikum Würzburg, Germany
P22MPI based 4D flow estimation – a simulation study
Jochen Franke, Bruker BioSpin MRI GmbH, Ettlingen, Germany; Physics of Molecular Imaging Systems, University RWTH Aachen, Germany
P23Incorporation of Superparamagnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles into Erythrocytes for MPI
Kristin Müller, University of Luebeck, Institute of Medical Engineering, Luebeck, Germany
P24Fluorescence Labeled MPI Tracer as a Visualization Tool for Different Cell Types
Kerstin Lüdtke-Buzug, University of Luebeck, Institute of Medical Engineering, Luebeck, Germany
P25Adaption of a system function for in-vivo media
Olaf Kosch, Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Berlin, Germany
P26Lateral Movement of a Helical Swimmer Induced by Rotating Focus Fields in a Preclinical MPI Scanner
Anna Bakenecker, Institute of Medical Engineering, University of Lübeck, Lübeck, Germany
P27Towards the visualization of biohybrid implants with MPI: SPION infused PCL
Henning Nilius, Physics of Molecular Imaging Systems, RWTH Aachen University, Aachen, Germany
P28Towards quantitative Flow Characterization of Fluids using Magnetic Particle Imaging
Robert Siepmann, Physics of Molecular Imaging Systems, RWTH Aachen University, Aachen, Germany
P29Longterm stable ferrogels for magnetic particle imaging phantoms
Lucas Wöckel, Institute of Biomedical Engineering and Informatics, Technische Universität Ilmenau, Ilmenau, Germany
P30Towards Standardized MPI Measurements
Patryk Szwargulski, Section for Biomedical Imaging, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany
P31Evaluation of different SPIONs for their potential as MPI-tracers
Stefan Lyer, Universitätsklinikum Erlangen, ENT-Department, Section of Experimental Oncology and Nanomedicine (SEON), Else-Kröner-Fresenius Stiftung-Professorship, Erlangen, Germany
10:30S07 - Instrumentation II (Poster and Coffee)
P32Excitation and Receive Unit for a Rotating Permanent Magnet Based FFL MPI System
Jonas Beuke, Institute of Medical Engineering, University of Lübeck, Lübeck, Germany
P33An Acoustic Magnetic Particle Spectrometer
Eric Aderhold, University of Lübeck, Germany
P34iMPI – inverted Magnetic Particle Imaging
Fabian Piekarek, University of Würzburg, Würzburg, Germany
P35Hybrid Gradiometer Design for Traveling Wave Magnetic Particle Imaging
Patrick Vogel, University of Würzburg, Würzburg, Germany
P36

WOTAN – low cost ultra small formfactor console for Magnetic Particle Imaging
Martin Rückert, University of Würzburg, Würzburg, Germany

P37Finite Element Analysis of Passive Magnetic Shields for a FFP MPI Scanner
Dilek M. Yalcinkaya, Department of Electrical and Electronics Engineering, Bilkent University, Ankara, Turkey
11:30S08 - Reconstruction II
 Chairs: Liu Wenzhong (China), Volkmar Schulz (Germany)
T17Exploiting ill-posedness in magnetic particle imaging - system matrix approximation via randomized SVD
Tobias Kluth, Center for Industrial Mathematics, University of Bremen, Bremen, Germany
T18MPI reconstruction using structural prior information and sparsity
Christine Bathke, Center for Industrial Mathematics, University of Bremen, Bremen, Germany
T19Direct Reconstruction of Lissajous MPI Data using Chebyshev Compressed System Matrices
Martin Möddel, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany
T20A Generalized Reconstruction Technique for Non-Cartesian X-Space MPI
Ali Alper Ozaslan, Bilkent University, Ankara, Turkey
T21Influence Of A Changing Tracer Distribution To Joint Image And Background Reconstruction
Marcel Straub, RWTH Aachen University, Aachen, Germany
T22Reconstruction of an object moved continuously through the Field of View in MPI
Patryk Szwargulski, Section for Biomedical Imaging, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany
13:00Group Photo
13:15Lunch Break

Friday, March 23, 2018 (afternoon)

14:00S09 - Applications II
 Chairs: Mauro Magnani (Italy), Jörg Barkhausen (Germany)
T23Temperature dependence of MPI spectra
James Wells, Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Berlin, Germany
T24

Spatial and temperature resolutions of magnetic nanoparticle temperature imaging with a scanning magnetic particle spectrometer
Jing Zhong, Technical University Braunschweig, Braunschweig, Germany

T25Influence of magnetic nanoparticle mobility on the harmonic response studied by Magnetic Particle Spectroscopy
Sebastian Draack, TU Braunschweig, Braunschweig, Deutschland
T26

Relaxation-Based Calibration-Free Multi-Color MPI for Field Free Line Scanners
Yavuz Muslu, Bilkent University, Ankara, Turkey

T27Characterization of single-core magnetic nanoparticles as tracer for mobility MPI
Frank Ludwig, Institut für Elektrische Messtechnik und Grundlagen der Elektrotechnik, TU Braunschweig, Braunschweig, Germany
T28Viscosity Mapping through Relaxation Effects for Functional Magnetic Particle Imaging
Mustafa Utkur, Bilkent University, Ankara, Turkey
T29Discriminating nanoparticle size using multispectral MPI
Martin Möddel, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany
15:30S10 - Instrumentation III (Poster and Coffee)
P38Preliminary Design of Hybrid of Magnetic Particle imaging and Optical Multimodality imaging System for Small Animals
Hui Hui, Institute of Automation, Beijing, China
P39Analysis and Comparison of Magnetic Fields in MPI using Spherical Harmonic Expansions
Marija Boberg, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany
P40A Method of Optimizing Transmit Coils for Magnetic Particle Spectrometer
Xin Chen, Institute of Medical Engineering, University of Lübeck, Lübeck, Germany
P41Design, Simulation and Construction of a Symmetrical Transmission Filter for MPI
Huimin Wei, Institute of Medical Engineering, University of Lübeck, Lübeck, Germany
P42Passive and Active Compensation of Drive Field Feed-Through for Multi-Frequency MPI
Dennis Pantke, Department of Physics of Molecular Imaging, Institute for Experimental Molecular Imaging, RWTH Aachen University, Aachen, Germany
P43A hand-held single-sided explorer for magnetic particle spectroscopy
Florian Fidler, Department of Experimental Physics 5, University of Würzburg, Würzburg, Germany
P44Complex Susceptibility Imaging of Magnetic Nanoparticles
Wenzhong Liu, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074, China
P45Design of a Switched-Capacitor Array for High-Power Applications with Dense Coverage of Medium Frequency-Range
André Behrends, Institute of Medical Engineering, University of Lübeck, Lübeck, Germany
P46Comparison of Extracellular and Intracellular Magnetic Hyperthermia Treatments Using Magnetic Particle Imaging
Kenya Murase, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Suita, Osaka, Japan
P47Quantitative Assessment of Pulmonary Mucociliary Transport Using Magnetic Particle Imaging: Effect of Surface Potential of Magnetic Nanoparticles
Kenya Murase, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Suita, Osaka, Japan
P48Optimization of Tri-Modal Imaging Protocol for Comparison of Various SPIO Nanoparticles: Initial Approach Based on Subcutaneous Application in Mice
Pavla Francová, Center for Advanced Preclinical Imaging, 1st Medical Faculty, Charles University, Prague, Czech Republic
16:15Quo Vadis - IJMPI
T30

Note by the Editor in Chief
Tobias Knopp, Germany

16:30S11 - Applications III
 Chairs: Lawrence Wald (USA), Ludek Sefc (Czech Republic)
T31Noninvasive detection and dynamic quantification of gastrointestinal bleeding with Magnetic Particle Imaging
Daniel Hensley, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, USA
T32

First temperature measurements of endovascular stents in MPI
Franz Wegner, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital Schleswig-Holstein, Lübeck, Germany

T33Exploiting Magnetic Relaxation in Magnetic Particle Imaging: First In Vivo Color MPI Results
Daniel Hensley, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, USA and Magnetic Insight, Inc., Alameda USA
T34Visualization of spatial and temporal temperature distributions in a liver tumor ablation model using Magnetic Particle Imaging
Johannes Martin Salamon, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany
17:30S12 -Survey on Applications
 Chairs: Thorsten Buzug (Germany), Tobias Knopp (Germany)
T35

Presentation and discussion of the results on the MPI application survey
N.N.

18:00Social Event
 Transfer to the habour, 18:30 boarding, Harbour cruise with dinner

Saturday, March 24, 2018

09:00S13 - Instrumentation IV
 Chairs: Takashi Yoshida (Japan), Volker Beer (Germany)
T36Parallel Magnetic Particle Imaging
Patrick Vogel, University of Würzburg, Würzburg, Germany
T37

An MPI-Compatible HIFU Transducer: Experimental Evaluation of Interferences.
Tim C. Kranemann, Chair of Medical Engineering, Ruhr-Universität Bochum, Bochum, Germany

T38Permanent Magnet Selection Coils Design for Single-Sided Field-Free Line MPI
Alexey Tonyushkin, University of Massachusetts Boston, Boston, USA
T39

First Phantom Measurements with a 3D Single Sided MPI Scanner
Ksenija Gräfe, Institute of Medical Engineering, University of Lübeck, Lübeck, Germany

T40First images from an atomic-magnetometry-based 1D and (hybrid) 2D MPI scanner
Victor Lebedev, University of Fribourg, Fribourg, Switzerland
T41A Magnetic Particle Detector for Margin Assessment in Breast-Conserving Surgery
Erica Mason, Harvard-MIT Health Sciences & Technology, Cambridge, USA
10:30Poster and Coffee
11:15S14 - Methods II
 Chairs: Kenya Murase (Japan), Frank Ludwig (Germany)
T42Metropolis Monte Carlo simulations of combined Néel and Brownian relaxation in superparamagnetic nanoparticles
Anton Lord, Physics of Molecular Imaging (PMI), Institute of Experimental Molecular Imaging (ExMI)
T43Relaxation Modeling and First Harmonic Recovery in Magnetic Particle Imaging
Volkmar Schulz, RWTH Aachen University, Aachen, Germany
T44Stochastic Simulations of Magnetic Particles: Comparison of Different Methods
Alexander Neumann, Institute of Medical Engineering, University of Lübeck, Lübeck, Germany
T45Increasing the MPI Frame Rate by Excitation Signal Phase-Shifting and Receive-Signal Splitting
Anselm von Gladiss, Institute of Medical Engineering, University of Lübeck, Lübeck, Germany
T46Stenosis Analysis by synergizing MPI and intravascular OCT
Florian Griese, Section for Biomedical Imaging, University Medical Center Hamburg Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany
12:30Wrap up
12:45Snack
13:30Lab-Tour

Sponsors

Details about Keynote and Tutorials

Keynote: Assessing MPI as a functional brain imaging modality

Lawrence L. Wald
Professor of Radiology, Harvard Medical School
Biophysicist, Massachusetts General Hospital
Director, MGH NMR Core, Martinos Center

Functional brain imaging has played an important role in recent advances in human neuroscience, allowing traditional psychology experiments to be carried out during non-invasive imaging sensitive to the metabolic or hemodynamic effects of brain activation.  This has allowed human neuroscience to move from indirect measurements such as subject responses and reaction times to direct interrogation of the brain regions and circuits used in a task.  The application of functional brain imaging has become so central to human neuroscience that most major psychology/neuroscience departments at US universities now operate an fMRI facility.

While fMRI is valued for its ability to noninvasively map the hemodynamic response to brain activation, its sensitivity is relatively low.  Studies typically require repeated trials and are averaged across multiple subjects to achieve statistical significance. The consequence of low CNR extends beyond the inconvenience of averaging and missing subtle effects. It prevents fMRI from impacting clinical medicine where decisions must be made for an individual, not a group average. The ability to make statements about a brain circuit’s function or dysfunction in individuals could provide means of phenotyping spectrum diseases such as the major mental illnesses; a potential breakthrough for diagnosis and treatment.

MPI offers an attractive and potentially very sensitive compliment to fMRI. We propose using a similar hemodynamic contrast mechanism; the local Cerebral Blood Volume changes during activation. Since injected SPIONs do not cross the blood-brain barrier, the direct measure of SPION concentration provided by MPI is a measure of local CBV and CBV changes (~20% during brain activation) will be directly effected in a time-series of MPI images.
 


Lawrence L. Wald, Ph.D., is currently a Professor of Radiology at Harvard Medical School, Affiliated Faculty of the Harvard-MIT Division Health Sciences Technology and Sara & Charles Fabrikant Research Scholar at the Massachusetts General Hospital. He received a BA in Physics at Rice University, and a Ph.D. in Physics from the University of California at Berkeley in 1992 under the direction of Prof. E.L. Hahn with a thesis related to optical detection of NMR.  He obtained further (postdoctoral) training in Physics at Berkeley and then in Radiology and MRI at the University of California at San Francisco (UCSF).  He began his academic career as an Instructor at the Harvard Medical School and since 1998 has been at the Massachusetts General Hospital Dept. of Radiology A.A. Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging.
His recent work focuses on improving methods for functional brain imaging. He has worked on the benefits and challenges of highly parallel MRI and its application to faster image encoding and parallel excitation and ultra-high field MRI (7 Tesla) methodology, and also improved method for studying the Human Connectome and portable MRI technology. Recent work has included studying the feasibility of functional brain imaging with Magnetic Particle Imaging (MPI) using Cerebral Blood Volume (CBV) contrast and analysis of the instrumentation needed for fMPI of humans.  This has also led to extending understanding of Peripheral Nerve Stimulation (PNS) in human MPI and MRI using electromagnetic body models with full nerve atlases and a detailed neuro-dynamic model to predict magneto-stimulation thresholds.  Dr. Wald is a Fellow of the International Society of Magnetic Resonance (ISMRM) and the College of Fellows of the American Institute for Medical and Biologial Engineering (AIMBE).  He will serve as President of the ISMRM in 2019.
 

Tutorial I: Introduction into the Magnetic Particle Imaging Data Format

Tobias Knopp Section of Biomedical Imaging, UKE, Germany

MPI research groups worldwide have developed custom file formats for the storage of MPI raw data and calibration data. The Magnetic Particle Imaging Data Format (MDF) has been developed with the goal to standardize these efforts. It is very flexible and allows to describe data measured with spectroscopy systems and FFP / FFL based imaging systems. It is still very easy to use and interfaces for most programming languages are available. Within this tutorial we will give an introduction into the file format and discuss various design issues that were raised during the development of the MDF. The general structure will be discussed and typical usages are outlined. We present example scripts available for various popular programming languages performing a simple image reconstruction. The data and the scripts are openly available and can be accessed during or after the tutorial.



Tobias Knopp is a professor for Biomedical Imaging at the Section for Biomedical Imaging at the University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf. He investigates MPI since 2007 with a special focus on image reconstruction and sequence development. Tobias Knopp is Editor-in-Chief of the International Journal on Magnetic Particle Imaging (IJMPI) since 2015.

Tutorial II: Physical Modeling of MPI

Tobias Kluth
Center for Industrial Mathematics, University of Bremen

Finding sufficiently accurate models for the forward operator in MPI is still an open problem. The behavior of various components in the signal acquisition chain makes modeling MPI a challenging task. We consider the problem of mathematical modeling the signal generation in MPI. For proper modeling it is necessary to take the different components (applied field, analog filter, particle's magnetic moment dynamics, etc.) into account and to discuss potential model errors. Physical models for the dynamic behavior of the particle's magnetic moment (Brownian/Néel rotation) and their influence on the MPI signal are considered in this tutorial.


Tobias Kluth is a postdoc at the Center for Industrial Mathematics (ZeTeM), University of Bremen. He studied Industrial Mathematics focusing on nonlinear inverse problems and electrical impedance tomography. In 2015 he did his PhD in computer science related to neuroscience addressing aspects of neural information processing in the human visual system. Since 2016 he is a postdoc at ZeTeM working on inverse problems in the context of MPI. His major research interests include mathematical modeling of MPI with a strong focus on image reconstruction.

Tutorial III: 3D Printing meets MPI

This tutorial will present some aspects of 3D rapid prototyping technologies that can enhance your MPI research and speed up your system development. We will focus on the usage of iterative prototype development, structural parts, imaging phantoms, and coil frames. As 3D prototyping has a lot of very geometry specific properties and a large amount of different parameter settings, beginning is a log way via try and error. With this introduction we will make you ready for starting with 3D prototyping within your own lab.


Thomas Friedrich studied physics at the University of Bayreuth. He did his PhD on magneto hydrodynamics in the department of physics in Bayreuth. As a postdoctoral researcher he joined the institute of medical engineering at the university of Lübeck, where he is working on magnetic particle imaging until today. Besides of using rapid prototyping for the development of MPI imaging hardware and phantoms, he also observes the technological development of “3D printing” with great enthusiasm. This enthusiasm combined with three years of experience in 3D printing will be shared with the participants of the tutorial.

Matthias Gräser studied electrical engineering and mechatronics at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology. After his exam he joined the research team of the institute of medical engineering at the University of Lübeck and worked on Magnetic Particle Imaging and Spectroscopy where he finished his PHD in 2016. Within this time he developed new hardware concepts for field generators, receivers and the analog signal processing. One key feature that pushed the research in MPI is rapid prototyping. In this context Matthias Gräser gained experience with various 3D printing technologies including SLS, FDM and STL. Since 2017 he works as postdoctoral researcher at the University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf.

Lab-Tour for Authors and Presenters

The Lab-Visit will take place on Saturday, March 24 from 13:30.

At Saturday afternoon after the official program of the IWMPI the MPI research group at the UKE offers a lab visit for interested conference participants. The lab visit will give an overview about the local research activities and has a special focus on presenting tools that are necessary in a preclinical research environment. The demonstration includes a live-demonstration and describes the workflow for bimodal MRI-MPI imaging sessions. In addition customizations of the MPI scanner including a tailored mouse-body coil and an online reconstruction platform are demonstrated.